Furniture Fanatic: Partition By ÖRNDUVALD

Ask an interior designer (also known as an interior architect and not an interior decorator) for an up-and-coming design trend – chances are they’ll answer, “designing for an open plan”.

As open plan interior architecture continues to rise, there is a growing need to define interior space. Instead of offices and homes having defined rooms, there is generally one main space that is partitioned by either furniture or other design elements. More often than not, furniture is used to create pathways for travel and barriers to delineate certain spaces. Nowadays, studio apartments and lofts need to have the flexibility to literally be an entire home in a space of 300-450 squarefeet. We’ve got the perfect solution: Partition by ÖRNDUVALD, a architecture and design studio based in Copenhagen, Denmark.

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Partition, designed by Pétur Örn Eyjólfsson and Søren Oskar Duvald, architects from The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, promotes the ideal of temporary spatial change. Two different dividers, the Frame and the Columns, become the foundation of the “modern-day room separator”. To the average consumer, it just looks like another modern piece of furniture, but it really is so much more.

Furniture Fanatic: Partition By ÖRNDUVALD
Frame / Partition, photo © ÖRNDUVALD.

Partition’s focus lends a heavy designer’s eye to texture, surface, functionality, and physical and visual relations. It almost reminds us a bit of Eric Manigian’s Pamsula Series. Scandinavian design is known for its hand craftsmanship and traditional design techniques – Partition is no exception. The design aims to make an architectural element look like a furniture piece.

Furniture Fanatic: Partition By ÖRNDUVALD
Frame / Partition, photo © ÖRNDUVALD.
Furniture Fanatic: Partition By ÖRNDUVALD
Column / Partition, photo © ÖRNDUVALD.

So let’s break it down a bit more. Here’s the play-by-play of Partition in terms of The Frame and The Columns.

The Frame is constructed of round sticks that have been dowel joined – it’s designed to pay homage to the conventional way of building a plasterboard partition (hello, junior year building systems class). The dowel joint round wooden sticks are inserted in all of the posts – that concept, paired with horizontal bands for constructive, functional, and decorative reasons, allows the Frame to have a more flexible design.

Frame / Partition, photo © ÖRNDUVALD.
Furniture Fanatic: Partition By ÖRNDUVALD

Don’t worry, we didn’t forget about The Columns. Crafted from red alder, the modern design and lack of extensive ornamentation, the lathe shaped columns hint at the simplicity of the craft of woodworking. The Columns, designed at a height of approximately 8′-9″, can be adjusted according to the height of the room. The construction of the Frame and Columns allow for various spatial arrangements and endless possibilities to create defined, livable spaces in open plan.

Furniture Fanatic: Partition By ÖRNDUVALD
Column / Partition, photo © ÖRNDUVALD.

Seeing as designing for an open plan is on the forefront of interior architecture, we’re thinking Partitions will continue to become a popular alternative for interior spatial planning.

Furniture Fanatic: Partition By ÖRNDUVALD
Column / Partition, photo © ÖRNDUVALD.

What do you think of this open concept partition?

(h/t:yatzer)

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